July 12, 2016

Schedule & Speakers

General Schedule

Thursday, October 20

Arrival in Philadelphia

Friday, October 21 at Bryn Mawr CollegeEly Room in Wyndham Alumnae House

Transportation to Bryn Mawr: Van leaves Sheraton Philadelphia University City at 7:45; Blue Bus Leaves Haverford at 7:40 and 8:40)

8 am: Breakfast Available

9 am: First Session: Late Latin Epic

11 am: Tea and Coffee Break

11:25 am: Second Session: Syriac Saints

12:45 pm: Lunch at Wyndham Alumnae House

2:20 pm: Third Session: North Africa

4 pm: Classics Tea, Quita Woodward Room, Thomas Hall

4:30 pm: Keynote address by Mark Vessey, Professor of English and Principal of Green College at the University of British Columbia, on “‘How Much ‘Literature’ is There in Late Antiquity Anyway?”

6 pm: Reception in London Room, Thomas Hall

Saturday, October 22 at Haverford College, Campus Center A-C

Transportation to Haverford: van leaves Sheraton Philadelphia University City at 8 am.

8 am: Breakfast Available

9:15 am: Fourth Session: Antiquarianism

10:35 am: Tea and Coffee Break

11 am: Fifth and Sixth Sessions: Sickness and Health; and Gaul

12:45 pm: Lunch at Campus Center

2:15 pm: Seventh and Eighth Sessions: Greek Literature in Reception; and Philosophy and Justice

5 pm: Plenary Conversation and Reception

7:15 pm: Conference Banquet at Azie on Main

Transportation to Haverford College and Sheraton Philadelphia University City

Schedule of Speakers

Friday

First Session: Late Latin Epic (9-11 am; Ely Room, Alumnae House, Bryn Mawr College)

Chair: Bret Mulligan (Haverford College)

Aaron Pelttari (University of Edinburgh), ‘The In Euangelia libri of Severus Episcopus and the Tradition of Scriptural Poetry in Latin’

Lynton Boshoff (Oxford University), ‘Rhetorical reimaginings of ancient epic: some Late Antique case studies’

Dennis Trout (University of Missouri), ‘Sagax animo: Reading Lucretius in Early Seventh-Century Rome’

 Second Session: Syriac Saints (11:25 am-12:45 pm)

Chair: Robert Germany (Haverford College)

Maria Doerfler (Yale University), ‘Speaking of Strangers: Continuities in rhetorical form and function to address social displacement in late antiquity’

Michael Motia (Harvard University), ‘“Only someone who had actually seen her”: On Misperceiving Holiness in Syriac Literature on Holy Women’

 Third Session: North Africa (2:20-3:40)

Chair: David Bright

Eric Fournier (West Chester University), ‘Victor of Vita’s Rhetorical Strategies: The Making of a Persecution in Vandal Africa’

Eric Rebillard (Cornell University), ‘What kind of literature are the Acts of the Christian Martyrs?’

 Keynote (4:30-6; Carpenter B21, Bryn Mawr College)

Mark Vessey, Professor of English and Principal of Green College at the University of British Columbia, on “‘How Much ‘Literature’ is There in Late Antiquity Anyway?”

Saturday

 Fourth Session: Antiquarianism (9:15-10:35 am; Campus Center, Haverford College)

Chair: Scott McGill (Rice University)

Marco Formisano (Universiteit Gent), ‘Subversive origins. The textuality of the late antique Origo gentis Romanae

Matthijs Wibier (Università degli Studi di Pavia), ‘Reading the Collatio as an antiquarian work’

 Fifth Session: Sickness and Health  (11 am – 12:45 pm)

Chair: Darin Hayton (Haverford College)

James Uden (Boston University), ‘Medical Failure in Late Antique Latin Poetry’

Sean Tandy (Indiana University), ‘Satiric Amalgamations in Late Antiquity: A Case Study of Two Enigmatic Poems, the Sancti Paulini Epigramma, and Maximianus’s Elegiae

Steven D. Smith (Hofstra University), ‘Of Mosquito Nets and Men (AP 9.764-766)’

 Sixth Session: Gallic Literature (11 am – 12:45 pm)

Chair: Joseph Pucci (Brown University)

Ella Kirsh (Marlboro College), ‘Just a μεμιγμενοβάρβαρον ὠδήν? Self-fashioning in Ausonius of Bordeaux’s later works’

Alison John (University of Edinburgh), ‘A Dismissed Missive: Claudianus’ Epistula ad Sapaudum and Teaching Greek in Fifth-Century Gaul’

Michael Hanaghan (University College Cork), ‘Epistolary Closure in Sidonius Apollinaris’

 Seventh Session: Greek Literature in Reception (2:15-4:45)

Chair: Charles Kuper (Bryn Mawr College)

Colin Pang (Boston University), ‘Quintus of Smyrna’s Critique of Homeric Arete

Leyla Ozbek (University of Cambridge – Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa), ‘On Philoctetes’ Heel: A Multilayered Intertext Between Quintus Smyrnaeus and Apollonius Rhodius’

Suzanne Abrams Rebillard (Cornell University), ‘Homer the Tragedian?: Gregory of Nazianzus’s Conception of the Tragic’

Alex Poulos (Catholic University of America), ‘Gregory of Nazianzus’ 1.2.1.1–214 as Callimachean Hymn to Virginity ‘

 Eighth Session: Philosophy and Justice (2:15-4:45)

Chair: Marc Mastrangelo (Dickinson College)

James Whitta (The Bentley School), ‘The Consolations of Philosophical Discourse: A Rereading of Boethius’ translatio of Platonic Dialogue in De Consolatione Philosophiae, Book Three’

Clifford Robinson (University of the Sciences), ‘The Ragged Clothing of the Mind: Three Philosophical Therapies in Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy’

Catherine Ware (University College Cork), ‘Spectacular justice: Rufinus in the arena’

Joshua Hartman (University of Washington), ‘Claudian and the Epicureans Revisited’

Concluding Conversation and Reception (5:00-6:45)

Celebratory Banquet at Azie (7:15pm)

 

Speakers

Suzanne Abrams Rebillard (Cornell University), ‘Homer the Tragedian?: Gregory of Nazianzus’s Conception of the Tragic’

Lynton Boshoff (Oxford University), ‘Rhetorical reimaginings of ancient epic: some Late Antique case studies’

Maria Doerfler (Yale University), ‘Speaking of Strangers: Continuities in rhetorical form and function to address social displacement in late antiquity’

Marco Formisano (Universiteit Gent), ‘Subversive origins. The textuality of the late antique Origo gentis Romanae

Eric Fournier (West Chester University), ‘Victor of Vita’s Rhetorical Strategies: The Making of a Persecution in Vandal Africa’

Michael Hanaghan (University College Cork), ‘Constantine’s Gaze in the Panegyrici Latini

Joshua Hartman (University of Washington), ‘Claudian and the Epicureans Revisited’

Alison John (University of Edinburgh), ‘A Dismissed Missive: Claudianus’ Epistula ad Sapaudum and Teaching Greek in Fifth-Century Gaul’

Ella Kirsh (Marlboro College), ‘Just a μεμιγμενοβάρβαρον ὠδήν? Self-fashioning in Ausonius of Bordeaux’s later works’

Michael Motia (Harvard University), ‘“Only someone who had actually seen her”: On Misperceiving Holiness in Syriac Literature on Holy Women’

Leyla Ozbek (University of Cambridge – Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa), ‘On Philoctetes’ Heel: A Multilayered Intertext Between Quintus Smyrnaeus and Apollonius Rhodius’

Colin Pang (Boston University), ‘Quintus of Smyrna’s Critique of Homeric Arete

Aaron Pelttari (University of Edinburgh), ‘The In Euangelia libri of Severus Episcopus and the Tradition of Scriptural Poetry in Latin’

Alex Poulos (Catholic University of America), ‘Gregory of Nazianzus’ 1.2.1.1–214 as Callimachean Hymn to Virginity ‘

Eric Rebillard (Cornell University), ‘What kind of literature are the Acts of the Christian Martyrs? ‘

Clifford Robinson (University of the Sciences), ‘The Ragged Clothing of the Mind:
Three Philosophical Therapies in Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy’

Steven D. Smith (Hofstra University), ‘Of Mosquito Nets and Men (AP 9.764-766)’

Sean Tandy (Indiana University), ‘Satiric Amalgamations in Late Antiquity: A Case Study of Two Enigmatic Poems, the Sancti Paulini Epigramma, and Maximianus’s Elegiae

Dennis Trout (University of Missouri), ‘Sagax animo: Reading Lucretius in Early Seventh-Century Rome’

James Uden (Boston University), ‘Medical Failure in Late Antique Latin Poetry’

Catherine Ware (University College Cork), ‘Spectacular justice: Rufinus in the arena’

James Whitta (The Bentley School), ‘The Consolations of Philosophical Discourse: A Rereading of Boethius’ translatio of Platonic Dialogue in De Consolatione Philosophiae, Book Three’

Matthijs Wibier (Università degli Studi di Pavia), ‘Reading the Collatio as an antiquarian work’