Syllabus of Activities

Week 1 (1.21): Introductions—the Seminar & Ovid’s Metamorphoses

  • In-class: reading and discussing the Proemium (Met. 1.1-4) and First Creation (1.5-88)

Week 2 (1.28): Creative Destruction

  • Please complete this welcome survey (I will use this, in part, to register you for the course websites)
  • Create an account on Annotate Studio; please enter “LATN350_2016” for your class.
  • Familiarize yourself with the outline of the Metamorphoses.
  • Make a vocabulary for yourself in The Bridge (try to screen out as much basic vocabulary as possible by eliminating, for example, the DCC Core (the 1000 most common words; vocabulary from your textbook, and other ancient works that you have read).
  • Context: P. Jones, “Introduction” in Reading Ovid (pp. 1-16); If you would like to know more about Ovid’s earlier poems, you may read G. B. Conte, “Ovid” in Latin Literature: a History (pp. 240-355).
  • LatinMetamorphoses 1.1-243 (Cosmogony, Myth of the Ages, Gigantomachy; Lycaon)
  • Scholarship Focus: McKim, R. (1985). “Myth against Philosophy in Ovid’s Account of Creation“. CJ 80, 97-108.
  • By Thursday at 10am, please indicate any and all sections of the Latin reading that remain unclear using this anonymous survey.

Week 3 (2.4): (Re)creations

  • Visit the Domus Ovidiana basecamp. In the “Docs & Files”, claim a week during which you would like to provide snacks and other delectables to the class on the De Officiis Crustulorum page. [Please note, if providing snacks will cause you any hardship, please email me and we can work out an alternative]
  • Continue to peruse the outline of the Metamorphoses. Identify 3 stories of particular interest and post these in the “messages” section on the Domus Ovidiana basecamp (respond to “My 3 Fabulae” to create a thread for the class). N.B. pick the three stories that most interest you, regardless of position in the poem, length, or other factors.
  • LatinMetamorphoses 244-567 (Deucalion and Pyrrha; Pytho; Apollo and Daphne)
  • Reception: gaze in fascination, admiration, horror, and/or shock at Bernini’s “Apollo and Daphne”
  • Scholarship: W.S. Anderson, “Style and Meter” in Ovid’s Metamorphoses Books 1-5 (pp. 19-29)
  • By Thursday at 10am, indicate any and all sections of the Latin reading that remain unclear using this anonymous survey.

Week 4 (2.11): Diagnosis…Bad Parenting (except you Sol, you tried your best)

  • Latin: Metamorphoses 1.568-1.779 (Io; Phaethon) and at least through 2.137 (but read as much of the rest of the Phaethon fabula as you can (2.138-400). I don’t expect that you’ll read all or even most of this section, but see how much you can read).
    • Claim a section that you would prefer to translate in class; be prepared to select 15-20 lines that you find the most challenging and/or interesting. In lieu of leading us through a section, you could volunteer to serve as amanuensis for the week.
  • English: the rest of Metamorphoses 2 (Apollo and Coronis; Mercury, Battus, and Aglauros)
  • Scholarship: E. J. Kenney, “The Metamorphoses: A Poet’s Poem” in P. Knox, A Companion to Ovid (pp. 228-247)
  • By Thursday at 10am, indicate any and all sections of the Latin reading that remain unclear using this anonymous survey.

Week 5 (2.18): Bloody Thebes

  • Review the draft list of fabulae and magistri.
  • EnglishMetamorphoses 3.1-137 (Cadmus)
  • LatinMetamorphoses 3.138-315 (Actaeon; Semele) and 3.316-510 (Judgement of Tiresias; Echo and Narcissus).
    •  Claim a section that you would prefer to translate in class; be prepared to select 15-20 lines that you find the most challenging and/or interesting. In lieu of leading us through a section, you could volunteer to serve as amanuensis for the week. You’ll see that each of the praetorships will cover a short section in each of the two halves of today’s assignment.
  • English: the remainder of Metamorphoses 3.
  • ScholarshipJ. Heath, “Diana’s Understanding of Ovid’s “Metamorphoses” Classical Journal 86.3.233-243.
  • By Thursday at 10am, indicate any and all sections of the Latin reading that remain unclear using this anonymous survey.

Week 6 (2.25): Ceres & Prosperpina [Maggie]

  • Prelude to Commentary…
    • Read: E. Fantham’s “Commenting on Commentaries: a Pragmatic Postscript” in Gibson and Kraus 2002, 407-419.
    • Write: an account of what your ideal version of a commentary on the Echo and Narcissus episode would contain. I encourage you to think about the commentary both on the macro level (cover-to-cover, what are all the parts, sections, resources, etc. that your dream commentary should have) and micro level (what amount, kinds, frequency of help, support, resources for reading and understanding a word, phrase, line, section). This thought experiment can take any written form that you like. (Care to try for an abacadarius? Go for it! A list or paragraph will also do nicely). It should be just as long as it needs to be. Be sure to bring your composition to class.
  • Review the draft list of fabulae and magistri. Contact me soon to begin planning assignments, activities, etc. for your week.
  • EnglishMetamorphoses 4-5.1.331 and the “Homeric Hymn to Demeter
  • Latinthe Prosperina fabula (5.332-571)
    • Read 5.332-384 extensively (read it through a few times, but pausing to look up a words only if you really loose the thread of what’s happening. Aim to understand in general terms who’s doing what where.
    • Master 5.385–493. This selection spans the core of the story; read it through, make notes about vocabulary, grammar, style, themes, etc.
    • Read 469-641 extensively
    •  Claim a section that you would prefer to translate in class; be prepared to select 15-20 lines that you find the most challenging and/or interesting. In lieu of leading us through a section, you could volunteer to serve as amanuensis for the week. You’ll see that each of the praetorships will cover a short section in each of the two halves of today’s assignment.
  • ScholarshipZissos, 1999. “The Rape of Proserpina in Ovid’s Metamorphoses.” Phoenix 53.1/2: 97-113.
  • As a treat… you are invited to read Swinburne’s “Garden of Proserpine” and Ovid’s treatment of the Proserpina episode in Fasti 4.417-620 [Latin] [English].

Week 7 (3.3): Arachne, Niobe…  (Latona Cycle) [James]

  • Towards a Commentary:
  • English (prelude and literary background)
    • Metamorphoses 5.641-678
    • Iliad 24.602-617 (or read in Greek if you prefer!)
  • Latin: Metamorphoses 6.1-145 (Arachne) and 4.146-312 (Niobe)
    • Master: 6.1-145 and 6.204-312. This selection spans the core of the story; read it through, make notes about vocabulary, grammar, style, themes, etc.
      • Claim a section that you would prefer to translate in class; be prepared to select the lines that you find the most challenging and/or interesting. In lieu of leading us through a section, you could volunteer to serve as amanuensis or scriptor for the week. You’ll see that each of the praetorships will cover a short section in each of the two halves of today’s assignment.
    • Read: 6.146-203 extensively. Read it through a few times, but pause to look up a word only if you really lose the thread of what’s happening. Aim to understand in general terms who’s doing what where. The summaries in the Delphin commentary may be of help.
  • Scholarship: E. Leach, 1974. “Ekphrasis and the theme of artistic failure in Ovid’s Metamorphoses”. Ramus 3.2: 102-142.
  • Reception:

Week 8 (3.17): Philomela & the Nightingale [Sage]

Week 9 (3.24): Medea… and Jason [Eliana]

  • Scholarship: Carol E. Newlands, “The Metamorphosis of Ovid’s Medea,” in Medea: Essays on Medea in Myth, Literature, Philosophy, and Art, ed. James J. Clauss and Sarah Iles Johnston (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1997): 178-208, posted in Basecamp; and J. A. Rosner-Siegel, “Amor, Metamorphosis, and Magic: Ovid’s Medea (Met. 7.1-424)” in The Classical Journal vol. 77 (1982): 231-243.
  • English: Amores 1.8.1-18 (to “…splits solid earth”); Heroides 12.129-174 (from “Why speak of the daughters of Pelias…” to “….she has the fruits of my labours”); Horace, Epodes 5 (all); Met. 7.425-865, 8.1-151. As before, feel free to read any or all of these in Latin if you have the time/inclination.
  • Latin: Met. 7.1-424.
    • Read 100-274 extensively
    • Master 1-99 and 7.275-424; claim your praetorships
  • Bonus: We’re not going to touch much on reception this week, but for a modern retelling (?) of the common Medea story and some examples of her portrayal throughout Western art history, feel free to check out Mallory Ortberg’s “summary” on The Toast: Dirtbag Medea.

Week 10 (3.31): Minotaur & Daedalus; Philomen and Baucis; Erysichthon? [Julie]

  • Commentary
    • Continue your sequential revision of the commentary drafts and start plotting how you plan to tackle your introduction/appendix sections. If you have not yet claimed a section to work on, please do so.
    • If you have not already done so, I recommend reviewing the Anderson, Cartwright, in usum Delphini, and Musgrove commentaries for guidance.
    • Macronize the Latin text of your passage using Johan Winge’s Latin Macronizer. Replace your text with the macronized text. You should review the auto-macronized text and flag any quantity that you have a question about. You can read more about this wondrous techno-magic here. You can also check the quantities against the Repertorium.
  • Latin:
    • Extensive Reading: 8.236-259, 8.547-724
    • Master: 8.152-235, 8.725-884, Aeneid 6.14-32
      • Sign up for two Praetorships (or serve as Amaneusis) here!
  • English (Or Latin/Greek if you so choose):
  • Scholarship:
  • Reception:

Week 11 (4.7): : Orpheus Cycle: House of Sleep; Pygmalion; Adonis; Atalanta [Carman]

  • Latin
    • Extensive Atalanta, pre- and post- race 560-637 +  681-707; Adonis’ death 10.708-39; Orpheus + Eurydice, part II 11.1-84
    • Master Orpheus + Eurydice, part I 10.1-105; Pygmalion 10.243-97; Adonis 10.503-59; Atalanta’s race 10.638-80
      • Sign up for two Praetorships (or serve as Amaneusis) here!
  • English
    • Myrrha 10.298-502; House of Sleep 11.573-649
  • Scholarship/reception: women and the feminized man

Week 12 (4.14): Little Iliad/Sack of Troy:  Hecuba, Polyxena, and Polydorus [Elizabeth]

  • Latin (intensive) [Praetorships]
    • Little Iliad/Sack of Troy: 13.399-428
    • Hecuba, Polyxena, and Polydorus: 13.429-575
  • For general context: Apollodorus, Library 5.23 with Frazer’s notes on the variants (on Perseus or the Loeb edition)
  • Euripides, Hecuba
  • Dan Curley, “Hecabe: off-center stage,” in Chapter 4 of Tragedy in Ovid: Theater, Metatheater, and the Transformation of a Genre
  • Optional: Euripides, Trojan Women

Week 13 (4.21): Little Aeneid [Andrew]

Week 14 (4.28):  Exciting But Inconclusive Finale: Caesar Assassinated! Comets! Pythagorean Vegetarianism! Who wins? Ovid Wins! [BEM]

  • Commentary (by Tuesday)
    • post your edited and formatted notes to DRUPAL
    • post your essays (formatted) to DRUPAL
  • Latin
    • MasterSign up for Praetorships
      • 14.805-829 (Apotheosis of Romulus)
      • 15.60-142 (Pythagoras on Vegetarianism)
      • 15.745-879 (Apotheosis of Caesar, There’s Something About Augustus, Sphragis)
  • English
    • The sections between the Latin readings in 14 & 15
  • Scholarship
    • Charles P. Segal, “Intertextuality and Immortality: Ovid, Pythagoras and Lucretius in Metamorphoses 15” Materiali e discussioni per l’analisi dei testi classici 46: 63-101.
      • Write two paragraphs on this article: in one, note a claim that you found provocative, exhilarating, clarifying, or just plain right (and why); in the other, note a claim that is weak, thin, misguided, absurd, unproven, or bizarre (and why).