Latin 2018

Ecce, Ludi Aestivi!
(aka
Latin Summer School)

Salvete, discipuli!

This summer, Professors Silverblank and Mulligan are organizing a community of Bi-Co Latin readers to get together (in person or via the wonders of technology) to read and discuss wild, wacky, and wonderful texts for an hour, once per week, from late May to August.

Students who are staying local over the summer can convene with the reading group on campus at Haverford, and students away from camp­­usover the summer can video conferenceinto the weekly meetups.

All students of Latin, at any level, are welcome to participate.

There will be no required texts and no expenses associated with this reading group. All texts will be made available on-line or as PDFs.

Meeting day and time TBD based on group scheduling. Lunch time? Late Afternoon? We’ll figure that out this week.

Readings will be selected to correspond to student interest, when students wish to explore new or familiar texts, and Professor Mulligan’s current research materials, when students want to get the chance to see the intersections between reading Latin and academic production.

Since our school is designed to be as flexible as possible to allow for a variety of levels of engagement, we’ve set three tiers for our activities. You should select your general tier of commitment for the summer as a guideline for how you approach the assignments, but you may jump tiers ad libitum text-by-text or week-by-week.

Much more information is below. I invite you to peruse it. If you would like to join us, drop me an email and I’ll send you a link to a Doodle poll so that we can try to schedule our meetup.

Curate ut valeatis!

BEM


Plus de Ludis Aestivis!

Explanation of Tiers

Tier 1: No prep necessary in advance of the weekly meetings, but you come along to keep your Latin sharp and to practice sight-reading. If you do any preparation in advance of the meeting, you might read the text out-loud in advance of weekly meetings, and note general themes and topics you can observe.

Tier 2: You read through the passage before our meeting and note the vocabulary words you don’t recognize. You commit these forms to memory, if possible. You re-read (as much as you can manage) with an eye for detail and with your syntactical synapses firing.

Tier 3: You memorize any unknown vocabulary words and do the complete reading with an eye for detail and with your syntactical synapses firing. You take on the week’s optional syntax review from Cursus. You review your vocabulary multiple times a week and test yourself on your vocabulary each week.  

All syntax review comes from Cursus.

 


Syllabus of Activities

Week 1

Reading: Aesop’s Fables in the telling of Romulus Anglicus: read 1, 2, 3 or more (as much or as little as you wish, according to your tier of choice)

A Rooster who discovers a pearl in poo! A tyrannous wolf! a treacherous frog!

Nota bene: although the edition of the Romulus that we’re reading is decidedly Medieval (no later than the 11th century CE), the syntax of these fabulae is remarkably similar to classical norms (viva Latina!); but you’ll notice that there are a few differences (e.g. the use of the the neuter relative when another gender would be expected), and especially some spellings that differ from classical norms. Here are a few highlights:

C’s for T’s: e.g. eciam for etiam; tercia for tertia

The collapse of diphthongs to a single long vowel, esp. AE to E: e.g. preter for praeter; mee for meae

Vocabulary: Memorize any unknown vocabulary words from “Aesop.” Vocabulary for the first 10 fables are available on the Bridge.

Syntax Review: Relative Clauses on Cursus (the bones are ready, although some pieces still underdevelopment)

Resources: a PDF with Romulus Anglicus 1-10, regularized to more familiar classical orthography.


Week 2

Zoom Room (for those off campus)https://zoom.us/j/597911375

Reading: More Aesop’s Fables in the telling of Romulus Anglicus: read 34, 5, 6, 7, 8 or more (as much or as little as you wish, according to your tier of choice)

Litigious and greedy doggies! Animal Avengers: Lion War! Kvetching Frogs!

Vocabulary: Memorize any unknown vocabulary words from “Aesop.” Vocabulary for the first 10 fables are available on the Bridge.

Syntax Review: Indirect Statements; review using these references [DCC A&G] [Latin Library] and/or this 12-minute video; ; then practice using Magistrula (from this page you can set your options for the indirect sentences that you’d like to practice).

Week 3

Zoom Room (for those off campus)https://zoom.us/j/858800652

Reading: More Aesop’s Fables in the telling of Romulus Anglicus: read 34, 5, 6, 7, 8 or more (as much or as little as you wish, according to your tier of choice)

Litigious and greedy doggies! Animal Avengers: Lion War! Kvetching Frogs!

Vocabulary: Memorize any unknown vocabulary words from “Aesop.” Vocabulary for the first 10 fables are available on the Bridge.

Syntax Review Redux: Indirect Statements; review using these references [DCC A&G] [Latin Library] and/or this 12-minute video; ; then practice using Magistrula (from this page you can set your options for the indirect sentences that you’d like to practice).

Week 4

Zoom Room (for those off campus)https://zoom.us/j/858800652

Physical Room (for those on campus): Hall 201

Reading: Dares the Phrygian’s History of the Sack of Troy (aim for the epistolary prologue and the first two sections; but try for more if you are able.). If you’re relatively new to Latin, you might skip the first paragraph (the opening of many Latin works tends to be the hardest: show offs!). Here’s a PDF for printing, etc., sī vīs.

A man pretending to be a famous Roman biographer pretends to write a pretend letter to someone he claims is a famous Roman historian about a pretend discovery he has made about pretend account of a pretend war! He begins by recounting almost completely unrelated myths!

Vocabulary: Memorize any unknown vocabulary words from Dares.

Syntax Review: Cum Clauses!

Week 5

Zoom Room (for those off campus)https://zoom.us/j/858800652

Physical Room (for those on campus): STO 118K OAR

Reading: Dares the Phrygian’s History of the Sack of Troy We’ll read the mini-Argonautica that starts the work and the section that links Jason to Troy (so the rest of Chapter 1 and hopefully through at least Ch. 4). Here’s a PDF for printing, etc., sī vīs.

Vocabulary: Memorize any unknown vocabulary words from Dares.

Syntax ReviewParticles! Review this handout; if I have time, I may make a worksheet later this week.

Week 6

Zoom Room (for those off campus)https://zoom.us/j/858800652

Physical Room (for those on campus): STO 118K OAR

Reading: Dares the Phrygian’s History of the Sack of Troy We’ll skip ahead to the midst of the War. Hercules and his companions sack Troy; Priam is the only survivor of the royal family and he rebuilds Troy on a magnificent scale. There’s raids of various sorts, including one in which Paris-Alexander steals Helen, followed by several embassies and slaughters. We pick up in Ch. XXI in the third year of the war. We’ll aim to read Chs. XXI, XXIII-XXIV. Ch. XXI contains the kernal of the story Homer tells in Iliad 3; the analogue for Ch. XXIV can be found in the last third of Iliad 6.Here’s a PDF for printing, etc., sī vīs.

Vocabulary: Memorize any unknown vocabulary words from Dares.

Grammar Review: Forms of Fīō (AG 204) and Ut with the Indicative (AG 527f and 543).

Week 7: Brevissima

Zoom Room (for those off campus)https://zoom.us/j/858800652

Physical Room (for those on campus): STO 118K OAR

Reading: Epigrams from Gibbs’ BrevissimaThe first 130 poems include only words from the 1000 commonest Latin words in the DCC Latin Core (also available via The Bridge). So unfamiliar words would be very much worth learning

Vocabulary: Memorize any unknown vocabulary words from the Brevissima. The Brevissima is in The Bridge, should you wish to create a full or customized vocabulary lists.

Grammar Review: Forms of 

Week 8: Newtonian Latin

Zoom Room (for those off campus)https://zoom.us/j/858800652

Physical Room (for those on campus): STO 118K OAR

Reading: this week we’ll take a walk on the scientific side and read some of the most important (scientific) Latin ever written: selections from Newton’s PHILOSOPHIÆ NATURALIS PRINCIPIA MATHEMATICA aka the Principia, which set the foundation for Classical Mechanics in Physics and pointed the way towards Calculus.

First, we’ll read the AXIOMATA, SIVE LEGES MOTUS together;

then we’ll take a look at the REGULÆ PHILOSOPHANDI (here with brief glosses); 

and read at least a bit and take a look at the Chapter Index of the Principia.

You can find a digital version of the Principia here. And a detailed description of the Principia and its impact at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Vocabulary: Memorize any unknown vocabulary words from the Brevissima. The Axioma and Regulae are in The Bridge, should you wish to create a full or customized vocabulary lists.

Grammar Review: Gerunds! (form in AG 155 and syntax in 502f.)

Week 9: a Philosophical Dessert

Zoom Room (for those off campus)https://zoom.us/j/858800652

Physical Room (for those on campus): STO 118K OAR

Reading: this week amble down the philosophical path with Seneca the Younger. Two paths are available for us: down one, one of the Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, #37 on the importance of virtue; down the other, very readable Proverbs by Seneca, Ausonius, Lactantius (and a few others).