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474-493: Narcissus is changed into a flower (I)

1 Leave a comment on paragraph 1 0 Dixit et ad faciem rediit male sanus eandem

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et lacrimis turbavit aquas, obscuraque moto                475

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reddita forma lacu est. quam cum vidisset abire,

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‘quo refugis? remane nec me, crudelis, amantem

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desere,’ clamavit; ‘liceat, quod tangere non est,

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adspicere et misero praebere alimenta furori.’

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dumque dolet, summa vestem deduxit ab ora               480

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nudaque marmoreis percussit pectora palmis.

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pectora traxerunt roseum percussa ruborem,

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non aliter quam poma solent, quae candida parte,

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parte rubent, aut ut variis solet uva racemis

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ducere purpureum nondum matura colorem.               485

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quae simul aspexit liquefacta rursus in unda,

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non tulit ulterius sed, ut intabescere flavae

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igne levi cerae matutinaeque pruinae

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sole tepente solent, sic attenuatus amore

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liquitur et tecto paulatim carpitur igni.               490

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et neque iam color est mixto candore rubori

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nec vigor et vires et quae modo visa placebant

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nec corpus remanet, quondam quod amaverat Echo.

 

474: The dactylic run speeds up the pace of the narrative.


475-6: moto: modifies lacu


476: vidisset: pluperfect subjunctive in circumstantial cum clause


480: summa . . . ab ora – “from the top edge,” “ripping one’s robe from top to bottom is a standard gesture of despair among Greeks and Romans” (Anderson 386).


481: marmoreis: Anderson points out that Narcissus has previously (at line 419) been compared “to a statue of Persian marble” (Anderson 386).


486: the antecedent of quae is pectora (482)


487: ulterius: neuter comparative
ut: introduces another simile (intabescere… solent)


488-490: Note how the sun, analogous in the simile to Narcissus’ love, becomes destructive. What is the effect of having the image of ripening fruit in the previous simile so close – juxtaposed(?) – to that of the destructive sun in this next simile?


492-493: nec corpus remanet: Ovid emphasizes that Narcissus does not just change forms but loses his body, corpus. Without his own body, Narcissus loses the object of his desire.

 

obscūrō obscūrāre obscūrāvī obscūrātus: to conceal

lacus lacūs m.: lake

quid: what; why

refugiō –ere –fugere –fūgī: to flee back, run away

remaneō remanēre remānsī remānsus: to stay behind; continue, remain

crūdēlis crūdēle: cruel, hardhearted, unmerciful, severe, bloodthirsty, savage, inhuman; harsh, bitter

clāmō clāmāre clāmāvi clāmātus: to proclaim, declare; cry/shout out; shout/call name of; accompany with shouts

quod: because, the fact that

alimentum –ī n.: nourishment, nutriment, aliment

summa summae f.: peak, summit

marmoreus –a –um: of marble, marble; like marble; smooth, marble–; fair (> marmor)

percutiō percutere percussī percussum: to hit, strike

palma palmae f.: hand, palm

roseus –a –um: rosy

percutiō percutere percussī percussum: to hit, strike

rubor rubōris m.: redness, blush; shame, disgrace

pōmum –ī n.: fruit

rubeō rubēre rubuī: to be red, be ruddy

ūva –ae f.: grape

racēmus -ī m.: a cluster of grapes and similar plants

purpureus –a –um: purple

mātūrus –a –um: early, speedy; ripe; mature, mellow; timely, seasonable

liquefaciō –ere –fēcī –factus –pass.; liquefīō –fierī –factus sum: to render liquid; melt, liquefy (> liqueo and facio)

in-tābēscō -tābēscere -tābuī — : to waste away, pine away; melt, dissolve

flāvus –a –um: golden, yellow

cēra –ae f.: wax; writing tablet coated with wax; wax bust or figure

mātūtīnus –a –um: pertaining to Matuta, goddess of the morning; in the morning, early, morning (> Matuta)

pruīna -ae f.: frost, snow, hoar-frost

tepeō –ēre: to be moderately warm; to reek

tenuō tenuāre tenuāvī tenuātus: to make thin, make fine

liqueō liquēre licuī/liquī: to be fluid, be liquid; be clear to a person; be evident

paulātim: little by little, by degrees, gradually; a small amount at a time, bit by bit

carpō carpere carpsī carptum: to pluck, seize

candor –ōris m.: shining, brilliant whiteness; whiteness (> candeo)

rubor rubōris m.: redness, blush; shame, disgrace

vigor vigōris m.: liveliness, activity, vigor

remaneō remanēre remānsī remānsus: to stay behind; continue, remain

quod: because, the fact that

ēcho -ūs f.: echo; a nymph named Echo

Source: https://iris.haverford.edu/echo/474-493-narcissus-is-changed-into-a-flower-i/